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McMINNVILLE 



COLLEGE 



79 

J UL 27 mi 

WWttSlTV OF , U 



1891-92 



McMINNVILLE 



COLLEGE m.ito iin , 



McMinnville, Oregon. 



"i 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
1891-92 

With Announcements for 
1892-3. 



YAMHILL COUNTY REPORTER BOOK AND JOB PRINTING OFFICE 
McMinnville, Oregon. 



DOEvS IT PAY TO ESTABLISH AND BUILD UP COLLEGES ? 



"Planting colleges and filling them with studious young men and 
women is planting seed corn for the world." — Adoniram Judson. 

A college that makes a "glorious union of the highest learning with 
the deepest piety, is a light to lighten the nations and the glory of our 
Israel." — George W. Eaton. 



IS A COLLEGE EDUCATION HELPFUL TO SUCCESS IN 
BUSINESS LIFE? 



"My own class in Harvard College numbered eighty-nine at grad- 
uation. Eleven of that number, or one-eight of the whole, have 
attained remarkable success in business. * * * In Eastern 

Massachusetts, graduates of Harvard get greatly more than their numer- 
ical proportion of the best places in banking, insurance, transportation 
and manufacturing. * * I speak from no little personal obser- 
vation when I say that there is no more striking general fact about the 
graduates of Harvard during the past fifty years than their eminent 
success in business. From one-fifth to one-third of the members of the 
successive graduating classes ultimately go into business. The same is 
probably true of many another American college." — President Elliott of 
Harvard University. 



THE BAPTIST COLLEGE 



AT McMINNVILLE 

Was Chartered 
by the Legislature of 
1858-9. It is Under the Con- 
trol of the Baptist Denomination of 
Oregon. Its Aim is to Offer to Young Men 
and Women the Best Education Possible at the Least Possible 
Expense to them. It has a Collegiate, Business, Preparatory and 
Musical Department. It has Five Courses of Study, Three 
Leading to Degrees and Two Leading to Certificates of 
Graduation. Full Information as to Expenses, 
Courses of Study and Advantages for 
the School Year 1892-93 will be 
found in this Catalogue. 



CALENDAR 1892-3 



The school year is divided into three terms of thirteen weeks each. 

First Term begins Tuesday, September 6, 1892 

Second Term begins Monday, Decembers, 1892 

Holiday Vacation December 25, 1892 — January 2, 1893 

Third Term begins Monday, March 12, 1893 

Regular recitations and full v.ork on the first day of each term. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1893 

Hon. W. C. Johnson, L. L. D Oregon City 

Hon. Henry Failing Portland 

Hon. Joseph Cravens Independence 

D. C. LaTOURETTE Oregon City 

N. J. Beagen Portland 

Rev. R. McKieeop McMinnville 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1894 

Rev. R. WhiTaker Salem 

Hon. J. N. Doeph Portland 

A. C. ChandeER McMinnville 

John H. Smith Astoria 

J. M . PrueTT, M. D Pendleton 

Henry F. Merriee Albany 



TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1895 

Rev. A. J. Hunsaker Independence 

Amasa Sanders McMinnville 

J. B. Magers 

Rev. C. M. Hiee Portland 

Rev. R. D. Grant Portland 

Rev. J. H. Teai,e East Portland 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY 



T. G. BROWNSON, President, 



Josiah Failing Professorship of English Literature. 
Latin, Psychology, Philosophy. 



EMAMUEL NORTHUP, 
Mathematics, Greek. 

MRS. T. G. BROWNSON. 
French, German, English. 

W. F. FARGO, 
Sciences, History. 

MRS. F. E. WOLFENDEN, 
Music, Elocution. 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 
Librarian . 



The names of the Faculty appear in the order of their appointment. 



COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT 



COURSES OF STUDY 



The aim of the ,College is to give such discipline of the mental 
powers as is essential to the highest success in business life, and at the 
same time to give a fair mastery of the branches that are here taught 
To-day hundreds who expect to enter business life, as well as those who 
are looking toward the professions, are anxious to secure the broadest 
culture and the most thorough mental training. A brief description of 
the courses of study is here presented : 

The Classical, Course gives a prominent place to those branches 
that for centuries have been considered the leading disciplinary studies: 
Greek, Latin and Mathematics. A thorough study of mathematics is 
universally recognized as of the highest value. The Latin and Greek 
languages are unsurpassed store houses of intellectual strength. These 
masterpieces in history, poetry and oratory, have been studied with de- 
light by the great scholars of all civilized nations. This course also 
furnishes a fair opportunity for the study of French, German, Litera- 
ture, History, the Sciences, Psychology and Philosophy. 

The Scientific Course offers special advantages in the sciences 
and the modern languages. Chemistry, Botany, Physics, Zoology, Geol- 
ogy and Astronomy are taken as a full study during the last three years 
of the course. Physical Geography is taught in connection with these 
studies. The text-book is used, but many experiments are given and 
much work done outside of the text-book. It is believed that this 
course as now offered is deserving of the heartiest patronage. 



McMINN VILLE COLLEGE. 



The Normal Course differs from the Scientific in that profes- 
sional studies hold a prominent place in the senior year. The aim of 
this Course is to give both mental discipline and professional knowledge 
together with such a mastery of the branches here studied as will fit 
the teacher for the highest positions in public school work. The second 
and third-rate positions in public school work are overcrowded, but there 
is a strong and increasing demand for thoroughly equipped teachers. 
The course here offered is not a short and easy course. It will require 
four years of hard work to complete it. Teachers who expect to secure 
and hold prominent and well-paid positions in the public school cannot 
afford to take a shorter course than this. Those completing this course 
will be eligible to the state certificate as provided for at the last legis- 
lature. 

The Business Course offers a superior business education. ''What- 
ever may be your choice of a business pursuit, it should be remembered 
that the better you are qualified for it, the more likely you will be to 
succeed in it. It is a fact which cannot have escaped the notice of any- 
one who has given the matter any thought, that those who are best 
educated for their business calling (other things being equal) invariably 
take the highest positions." These sentences from the pen of a promi- 
nent business man deserve the careful study of the youth of to-day. 
It is beyond dispute that a thorough business education is a prerequi- 
site to eminent success in business life. Such an education cannot be 
obtained without close application and persistent stud}-, and it cannot 
be obtained in a few short months. The course here offered is not an 
easy one. It requires two years of hard study to complete it, but it is 
none too thorough for those to master who expect to take prominent 
positions in business life. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



ADMISSION. 



To enter any one of the above courses students will be required to 
pass a satisfactory examination in Reading, Writing Spelling, Geogra 
phy, English Grammar, Written and Mental Arithmetic, United States 
History and Physiology, or to furnish satisfactory evidence that they 
have fairly mastered these branches. Proficiency in these branches lies 
at the basis of all successful work in the studies pursued in the college 
course . The Preparatory Department offers superior advantages to stu- 
dents who are deficient, in these common branches. 



SPECIAL STUDIES. 



Manj 7 students are so situated that they cannot see their way to take 
a regular course . To such students the best of advantages are offered to 
take such studies as they desire. Such students will have just as thor- 
ough instruction and just as good opportunities in every respect as those 
taking a regular course. Attention, however, is called to the fact that 
as a rule students receive more real benefit by entering upon a regular 
course, even if they cannot see their way to complete that course. 



DEGREES. 



The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon those who 
complete the Scientific Course ; the degree of Bachelor of Literature 
upon those who complete either the Classical or the Normal Course, and 
a diploma upon those who complete the Business Course. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



TRAINING OF TEACHERS. 



The demand for thoroughly trained teachers becomes more imper- 
ative year by year. While Normal Schools are doing an important 
work, their courses of study are too short to fit teachers to secure and 
hold the leading positions in the public schools. More and more is it 
becoming true that the best salaried and most prominent positions in 
the public schools are held by college graduates. Experience has abun- 
dantly shown that there is no training so effective for the teacher of the 
public school as that of the well equipped college. The recent act of 
the legislature of Oregon, as given below, is a hearty recognition of the 
successful work of the college as a preparatory school for teachers. 
One reason why McMinnville College is offering so thorough a Normal 
course is because of this increasing demand for college graduates as 
teachers in the public schools. 



LEGISLATIVE ENACTMENT. 



Be it enacted by the legislative assembly of the State of Oregon, 
That all persons who shall complete a required course of study and re- 
ceive a literary degree therefor in any institution of learning of collegi- 
ate or university grade, chartered or incorporated under the laws of this 
state, and shall have passed such examination thereon as may be 
approved by the State Board of Education, shall be entitled to receive 
a State Diploma, as is now authorized by law, and after six years of suc- 
cessful teaching in the State of Oregon, shall be entitled to the State 
Life Diploma, as now provided by law, when they shall have paid the 
required fee for said diploma. 



[() 



mcminnville college. 



CLASSICAL COURSE 



Fai^i^ Term. 
Algebra 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
General History 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Winter Term. 
Algebra 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
Gen. History 



Spring Term. 
Algebra 
Caesar 

Political Economy 
Gen. History 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



Algebra 

Caesar 

English Literature 

Greek Reader 



Higher Arithmetic Higher Arithmetic 

Caesar Cicero 

English Literature American Literature 

Greek Reader Xenophon 



Geometry 
Cicero 
Xenophon 
German 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



Geometry 


Geometry 


Virgil 


Virgil 


Homer 


Homer 


German 


German 



Trigonometry 
French 
Herodotus 
Christian Evidences 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Trig, and Surveying 

Livy 

Herodotus 

Bible Study 



Psychology 

Livy 

vSophocles 

Moral Philosophy 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



n 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE 



Faee Term. 
Algebra 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
General History 



Algebra 

Caesar 

English Literature 

Chemistry 



Geometry 
Cicero 
German 
Physics 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Winter Term. 
Algebra 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
General History 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Higher Arithmetic 

Caesar 

English Literature 

Chemistry 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



Spring Term. 
Albebra 
Caesar 

Political Economy- 
General History 



Higher Arithmetic 

Cicero 

Amer. Literature 

Botany 



Geometry 


Geometry 


Virgil 


Virgil 


German 


German 


Physics 


Zoology 



German 
French 
Trigonometry 
Geology 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Livy Livy 

French French 

Trig, and Surveying Psychology 

Astronomy Astronomy 



MeMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



NORMAL COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



Faee Term. 


Winter Term. 


Spring Term. 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Algebra 


Latin Reader 


Latin Reader 


Caesar 


Rhetoric 


Rhetoric 


Political Economy 


General History 


General History 
SOPHOMORE YEAR. 


General History 


Algebra 


Higher Arithmetic 


Higher Arithmetic 


Caesar 


Caesar 


Cicero 


English Literature 


English Literature 


Amer. Literature 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 
JUNIOR YEAR. 


Botany 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Geometry 


Cicero 


Virgil 


Virgil 


German 


German 


German 


Physics 


Physics 
SENIOR YEAR. 


Zoology 



French 

Geology 

Hist. Education 

Trigonometry 



French French 

Astronomy Psychology 

School Management Astronomy 

Art of Teaching Oreg. School Law 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



13 



BUSINESS COURSE. 



FAEE TERM. 
Algebra 
Rhetoric 
Chemistry 
Civil Government 



FIRST YEAR. 

WINTER TERM. 
Algebra 
Rhetoric 
Chemistry 
Book-Keeping 



SPRING TERM. 
Algebra 

Political Economy 
Botany 

Com. Arithmetic 
Book-Keeping 



SECOND YEAR. 



Algebra 

Geometry 

Physics 

English Literature 



Higher Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Physics 
Book-Keeping 
Commercial Law 



Higher Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Amer. Literature 
Zoology 
Book-Keeping 



14 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



For the present it seems advisable and necessary to offer opportunity 
to study the common branches. Some of our students have been out of 
school for several years and find it necessary to review the common 
studies. Some of our students have been over the common studies, but 
have not mastered them. We also have each year quite a number of 
students who come because they are convinced that superior advantages 
are offered in the common branches. So long as it seems best to main- 
tain this department, superior advantages will be offered. At present 
there is offered in this department a course of study covering two years. 

PREPARATORY COURSE. 



FAIvI, TERM. 

Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 



FIRST YEAR. 

WINTER TERM. 

Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

Geography 

Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 

SECOND YEAR. 



SPRING TERM. 

Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Geography 
Reading 
Writing 
Spelling 



Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

U. S. History 

Physiology 

Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 



Arithmetic 

English Grammar 

U. S. History 

Physiology 

Reading 

Writing 

Spelling 



Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
U. S. History 
El. Algebra 
Spelling 
Writing 
Reading 



MeMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



THE MUSICAL DEPARTMENT 



Recognizing that the fine arts are an important element in mental 
culture, and that attainments in instrumental and vocal music are of 
great practical value to young men and women, special effort has been 
put forth the last two years to make the musical department of this 
college one of the best in the state. The growth of this department has 
been exceptionally encouraging. While the aim has been to secure the 
most efficient teaching that can be secured, it has also been the desire of 
the institution to make the tuition as low as possible, in order that those 
of limited means may avail themselves of the advantages that are 
offered. Superior instruction in vocal music in classes is offered at 
merely a nominal tuition . The value of the voice culture that is thus 
secured cannot be overestimated. Its value is seen not only in singing, 
but in public speaking as well. 

SIGHT-READING CLASS. 

All pupils, whether study instrumental or vocal music, should enter 
the department of sight-reading. The ability to read music at sight lies 
at the basis of a true musical education. Very few among the thous- 
ands who are studying music are able to read even plain hymn tune 
correctly at sight, consequently labor under great disadvantage. 



1 6 McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



MUSIC COURSE 



PIANO. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Mathews' Twenty Lessons to a Beginner. MacDougall's Studies in 
Melody and Mason's Touch and Technics. 

FIRST year. 

Lebert and Stark Book II. Kuhlau Sonatines, Haydn Sonatas, 
Technical Exercises and Scales from memory. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Heller op. 46 and 47. Czerny op. 299, Mozart and Schubert Sona- 
tis, Spindler op. 141. Technical Studies. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Cramer Studies, parts 1, 2 and 3. Bach's two part inventions. 
Kulluck's Octave Studies. Technical Studies. Mendelssohn's Songs 
without words. Beethoven Sonatas. Chopin Waltzes. Elements of 
Harmony, Emery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Clementi Gradus ad Parnassum, parts 1 and 2. Bach's Well-Tem- 
pered Clavichord. Chopin Nocturnes and Ballades. Concertos by 
Mendelssohn, Hummel and Beethoven ; also concert pieces by Mendel- 
ssohn, Weber, Rubenstein and Liszt. Elements of Harmony, Emery. 

All pupils entering the four years course in piano, must have a 
knowledge of the rudiments of music, and must have completed the 
work of the preparatory department or its equivalent. 

The course of study in piano-forte playing is systematically arranged, 
and pupils who complete the course will be graduated in music with an 
appropriate diploma. The time occupied in completing this course will 
depend upon the ability of the pupil and the proportion of time devoted 
to musical study. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 17 



EXPENSES 



Tuition in Senior year is $14 a term ; in all other classes in any de- 
partment $11 a term. Room rent in the college building $3, $4, $5 a 
term, each student, according to room. Fuel, each room, per year, $8, 
$10, $12, according to room. Elocution, in class, one lesson 
a week, $1 a term. Vocal music, in class, two lessons a week, (twenty- 
four lessons) $1.25 a term. Private lessons in voice culture, on the 
piano, organ, banjo or guitar, one lesson a week, per term of 13 weeks, 
$8.50. Private lessons in voice culture, on the piano, organ, banjo or 
guitar, one lesson a week, half-term (six lessons) $4. When two lessons 
a week are taken, a reduction of ten per cent is given. Use of piano 
one hour a day, $3 per term. Diploma, $5. 

Ahh bills are TO BE paid in advance. No deductions are made 
except in cases of protracted sickness. Absences of a few days invari- 
ably make extra work for teachers. 

Inquiry is often made as to the expense for a year. The following 
table covers all the necessary expenses. The lowest and the highest 
necessary expenses are given. The total annual expense — exclusive 
of clothing and traveling expenses — need not exceed $200. 

Lowest. Highest 

Tuition $33 $ 42 

Room Rent 9 15 

Fuel and Lights. .' 12 18 

Board $3 a week , 39 weeks 117 117 

Washing 10 16 

Books 6 12 

$187 $220 



1 8 MeMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



FACTS WORTH CONNING. 



The aim of this College is "to offer young men and women the best 
education possible at the least possible expense to them." The study 
of a large number of catalogues shows that at many colleges the ex- 
penses are very much higher. In several colleges of this state the 
tuition is considerably higher than at McMinnville. In nearly all the 
tuition in music is higher. Board in private families is as cheap or 
cheaper than in any college town in the state. 



COMPARED WITH EASTERN COLLEGES 



Expenses are much lower at McMinnville. At the University of Roch- 
ester tuition is $75 a year ; at Amherst, $110 and room rent from $18 to 
$45 a year ; at Rutgers, tuition $75 a year, incidentals $8 and reading 
room fee $2. At Wesleyan tuition is $75 a year, room rent from $12 to 
$50 and incidentals $21 a year. At Brown University tuition is $100 a 
year, room rent $32 to $70, incidentals, for those not residing in the 
college, $29 a year, and for those in the college, $43. At the University 
of Pennsylvania tuition is $150 a }^ear ; at Chicago University $25 a 
quarter. 

In Peddie Institute, music is $50 a year ; in Bucknell University, $45 
a year ; in Cook Academy, $60 a year ; in Syracuse University, $100 a 
year ; in Connecticut Literary Institute, 75 cents a lesson ; in Whitman 
College, 24 half-hour lessons for $16 ;in Ottawa University, 20 lessons 
for $12, $15, $18, according to grade of student; in California College) 
$40 a year ; in the University of Oregon, $1 a lesson. These facts are 
all taken from the catalogues of the above institutions. They show that 
tuition in all departments in McMinnville College is considerably cheap- 
er than in many other institutions, both East and West, although ex- 
penses in the East are supposed to be much less than on the Pacific 
Coast. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 19 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



LOCATION. 



McMinnville College is located just outside the city limits of Mc- 
Minnville, Oregon. McMinnville is easily accessible from every part of 
the North Pacific coast, being situated on the Southern Pacific Railroad, 
west side division, 50 miles south of Portland. From all points south 
there is direct connection ; by the way of Albany and Corvallis, or by 
stage from Salem to McCoy and thence by the Southern Pacific to Mc- 
Minnville, or by way of Portland. 



BUILDING AND GROUNDS. 



The College has a campus of 30 acres, admirably adapted for the 
purpose and beautiful for situation. Upon this campus there was built 
in 1882 one of the finest buildings for educational purposes to be found 
on the Pacific coast. The building is 106 feet in length, 79 in breadth, 
and four stories in height. The basement story contains accommoda- 
tions for a boarding department ; the second affords a commodious 
chapel, President's rooms, class rooms, etc. ; the third and fourth, class 
rooms, library, a number of eligible rooms for students, and Philergian 
hall. 



MeMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



DISCIPLINE. 



Self-government is the ideal at McMinnville College. Students are 
expected to conform to the usages of good society, and to conduct them- 
selves as they would in a refined, well-ordered home. Only those who 
are willing to do so are desired as pupils. No set of rules to cover all 
cases can be laid down. A high moral sense is necessary to guide a 
student in a society like this. If a student does not have this and . it 
cannot be developed in him, his parents will be notified, after a due 
trial, to remove him from the school. This is not a reform schoov, 
young men are expected to give evidence of manhood, and young 
women of womanhood. 



TEXT-BOOKS. 



Only a partial list of text-books is here given. Arithmetic, Fish ; 
Grammar, Clark, Reed and Kellogg ; Algebra, Robinson's Elementary, 
Wentworth ; Geometry, Trigonometry, Wentworth ; U. S. History, 
Barnes ; General History, Barnes ; Rhetoric, Hill ; Physiology, Hutch- 
inson ; Physical Geography, Houston ; Latin Grammar, Harkness ; 
Latin Reader, Harper and Burgess ; Harkness' Preparatory Course in 
Latin Prose Authors ; Virgil, Brooks ; Greek Grammar, Goodwin ; 
First Lessons in Greek, White ; Anabasis, Goodwin ; Roman History, 
Leighton ; English Literature, Shaw ; Logic, Jevon ; Psychology, Hill ; 
Geology, Dana; Astronomy, Young; French, Ahn ; German, Ahn ; 
Moral Philosophy, Robinson ; Zoology, Orton. 



ELOCUTION. 

__J 

Friday evening musical and literary entertainments have been held 
during the last four years, and have proved a splendid opportunity for 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



elocutionary practice. All of the students have the privilege of taking 
part in these exercises, and all have the opportunity of receiving elocu- 
tionary drill free of charge for these entertainments. The Philergian 
society also furnishes excellent opportunity in this line of work. It 
meets regularly each Saturday night. Private classes in elocution will 
be organized at a mere nominal expense, when desired. 



THE LIBRARY. 



Each year the students appreciate more and more the excellent 
library that the college now possesses. Valuable additions have been 
made the last year. "McMinnville College Library Day" enables the 
college to buy a few new books as they are needed, but that day is not 
as fully observed as it ought to be. Great libraries grow, book by book. 
Constant additions must be made. We look to the friends of the college 
for help to make the library still better. We need additions in History, 
English Literature, Biography and Science especially. 



THE READING ROOM. 



The interest in this room is growing year by year. A partial list of 
the papers in the reading room the last year is the following : The Ex- 
aminer, The Daily Oregonian, The Standard, The Christian Herald, The 
Christian Inquirer, The Chicago Herald, The Leader, The Pacific Bap- 
tist, The Baptist Sentinel, The Baptist Teacher, The Worker, The Mis- 
sionary Magazine, The Home Mission Monthly, Education, The North 
American, The Educational Review, The Forum, The Reporter, The 
Telephone, The Astorian, The Young Men's Era. Most of these will be 
in the reading room the coming year. It is hoped that others may be 
added. Contributions to this room are solicited. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



SOCIETIES. 



The Philergian Society, composed of young ladies and gentlemen „ 
meets regularly each Saturday evening. The exercises, consisting of 
singing, debates, essays, recitations, orations, declamations, etc., are of 
great value to the students. 

The Missionary Society holds a public meeting once a month. 
These meetings are growing in interest and in value . During the pres- 
ent year there has been a systematic study of various mission fields. 

There is also among the students an organization of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and Young Women's Christian Association. 
These hold meetings regularly for the study of the Bible and for religious 
culture. These meetings have proved to be of great benefit to many 
students, encouraging them in christian work and fitting them for larger 
usefulness in after years. 



RELIGIOUS CULTURE. 



This College was founded to promote christian culture. Every 
teacher is a professed christian. The Baptist church of McMinnville 
takes special interest in the religious culture of students. Many of the 
students are earnest Christians, and deeply interested in their fellow 
students. Firmly believing that intellectual culture and religious cul- 
ture should be closely united, patrons of the College may rest assured 
that earnest efforts will be put forth to make the religious atmosphere 
healthy to the best culture of the students. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



AID TO STUDENTS. 



It is the aim of the Trustees to have McMinnville College always 
accessible to young men and women of limited means, especially such as 
desire an education that they may be come useful in some form of 
christian work. Direct aid is not given to any extent, but a number of 
students are each year furnished with work by the friends of the College 
to pay in part their expenses. A boy or girl of pluck and perseverance 
can work out an education, and is encouraged to do so. Applications 
for work should be made to the president at an early day and accom- 
panied with suitable references. Young men with the ministry in view 
and young women who desire to fit themselves to become missionaries 
are especially invited to correspond with the President, and every effort 
will be put forth to help such secure a thorough education. A leading 
feature of the Oregon Baptist Education Society is to assist approved 
students in Baptist schools. 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS, 



In the College building are a few fine rooms for students. Most of 
these rooms are not furnished, except with a stove. There are accom- 
modations for a few young ladies on the same floor with the President's 
living rooms. The basement is usually rented to a family with the 
privilege of keeping boarders. Table board the last year was three 
dollars a week. A number of families live within a few minutes' walk 
of the building, where private board, with or without room, can be ob- 
tained at reasonable prices. Quite a number of students club together 
and hire rooms and keep house. This is an economical way of doing. 
So far, there has been no trouble in getting board at low prices. 



24 McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



REQUIREMENTS. 



Regular attendance at chapel service. 

Regular attendance at all recitations. 

Strict observance of study hours. 

Payment of all damages to furniture and building. 

Tuition, room rent, fuel and music bills in advance. 



PROHIBITIONS. 



1. The dropping of a study without leave of the teacher. 

2. The taking of more than four full studies, except by special per- 
mission . 

3. Absence from town without permission. 

4. The use of tobacco in the building or on the college grounds. 

5. The visiting of any saloon or billiard hall. 



EXAMINATIONS 



Are held from time to time , occupying the time of the regular recita- 
tion. As a rule, examinations are held at the close of each term ; some- 
times at the close of a study only, when it comes near the end of a term. 
All recitations and examinations are marked on a scale of 100, and an 
average of 75 is required before passing from one class to another. An 
accurate record of the standing of each student is preserved, both of 
recitations and examinations. Reports will be sent to parents or guard- 
ians on application. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 25 



SPECIAL REQUEST. 



You who receive this catalogue will receive it because you are be- 
lieved to be deeply interested in higher education. Your help in the 
building up of McMinnville College is earnestly solicited. There are 
many ways in which you can do so. You can speak a good word for the 
College. You can place this catalogue in the hands of persons whose 
thoughts and hearts may be turned toward the college. You can send 
the President names of persons who might be favorably influenced by a 
catalogue or a personal letter from him. You can remember this school 
in your prayers ; you can remember it in your will. The college looks 
to you for help in one or all of these various ways. See to it that she 
does not look in vain. 



THE GROWTH OF FIVE YEARS. 



Since the erection of the college building in 1882, the college has 
had a steady and healthy growth. During the last five years that 
growth has been especially encouraging. In that time the library has 
grown from 515 to 1666 volumes ; the receipts from tuition last year were 
considerably more than twice what they were five years ago ; two fine 
pianos have been secured for the music department ; two salaried 
teachers have been added to the faculty ; a fine telescope secured, and 
some $8,000 added to the permanent endowment. The growth of these 
years certainly justifies the heartiest support of the many friends of the 
college. 

It must, however, be remembered that this growth calls for enlarged 
facilities. Growth always creates demand for larger resources. Some 
needs are becoming imperative. One of these is more apparatus for 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE 



Ralph E- Storey 
Fern Stout 
Jessie Stout 
Marian Sully 
Ella Swanson 
Singne Swanson 

George W. Swope 
William Ungermam 
Arthur Waddel 
Edwin Waddel 
Mattie Walton 
Charles J. Weed 
Carl L. Weed 
George Williams 
Mertie Williams 
Ward J. Wisecarver 
Clyde E. Wolf 
Ambie Wright 
Hattie Wright 



McMinnville 

Carlton 

McMinnville 

Carlton 

Oregon City 
McMinnville 
Amity 

LaCamas, Wash. 
McMinnville 



Collegiate- 
Academic 



Collegiate 
Academic 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 



INSTRUMENTAL, 



Minerva Alexander 
Sadie Fitch 
Josie Gardner 
Eddie Graham 
Mitchell Haynes 
Lizzie Handley 
Lellie Latourette 
Lyman Latourette 
John H. Loder 
May Million 
Arthur McPhillips 
Lena Pagenkopf 
Sadie Smith 
Singne Swanson 



Wilber Cook 
Eleanor Florey 
Holda Granstrom 
Emma Hawley 
Eva Hoberg 

• Jones 

Nina Latourette 
Luella Lynch 
Jewell Mark 
Ethlyn Million 
Ida Pagenkopf 
Maggie Roof 
Ella Swanson 
Ambie Wright 



28 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



Francis Deilsclmeider 
Blanche Derr 
Nettie Dickinson 
Bradford Dodson 
James B. Dodson 
William J. Dodson 
Letta Fellows 
Wirt Fellows 
Eleanor Florey 
Charles Gregory 
Delia G. Garrison 
Eddie D. Graham 
George H. Handley 
Mitchell Haynes 
J. R. G. Haynes 
Flora Henderson 
Ralph Herbert 
Rupert C. Hill 
John W. Hilleary 
Eva Hoberg 
Albert Huguelet 
Alberta Ingraham 
Clara Jeter 
Lyman E. Latourette 
Nellie E. Latourette 
S. E. Lapham 
John H. Loder 
Luella Lynch 
Colman Mark 
Jewell Mark 



McMinnville 



Academic 



Gaston 
Sheridan 
McMinnville 
Caples, Wash. 
Tillamook 

Bonanza 

i < 

McMinnville 

Seattle, Wash. 

Damascus 

McMinnville 



Buena Vista 
McMinnville 

Vancouver, Wash. 

Carlton 

McMinnville 



Collegiate 
Academic 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



29 



Jennie McCutcheon 
Scott McCutcheon 
Nellie McMillem 
Arthur McPhillips 
Berton Millsap 
Ethlyn Million 
Grace Million 
May Million 
Jennie Nichols 
E. W. Oliver 
Anna Pagenkopf 
Ida Pagenkopf 
Lena Pagenkopf 
Bert Pearson 
Arthur L. Pope 
Gertrude Pond 
Laura Powers 
Frank Purvine 
Fred A. Ramsey 
Matthew G. Redmond 
William D. Risley 
Maggie Roof 
Arthur Royce 
Willie Scott 
J. Winfield Scott 
Sara Scott 
Etta Shurtleff 
Ruby Shurtleff 
Harry H Sharpe 
Rebecca Smith 
Georgia E. Storey 



•Carlton 

Woodburn 
McMinnville 

Stevensville, Moi3t. 



Astoria 
McMinnville 
Wells 



McMinnville 



Elk City 

Zena 

McMinnville 

Albany 
McMinnville 
Gooseberry 
Carlton 



McMinnville 



Brownsville 
McMinnville 



Academic 



Collegiate 
Academic 



Collegiate 



Academic 



26 MeMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



teaching science. Another is the payment of a floating debt that was 
incurred several years ago. A more imperative need is the increasing 
of the permanent endowment. Who is ready to invest some money for 
these things. 



THE OUTLOOK. 



It grows brighter each year. Each year the regular income is in- 
creasing. Each year the students as a body are superior in their attain- 
ments to those of the preceding year. Each year confidence in the 
future of the college becomes stronger. Each year new friends are 
secured. The last year was by far the best financial year in the history 
of the college. There is every reason to believe that the coming year 
will be better still. The outlook is certainly full of promise. 

Any information not found in this catalogue will be gladly furnished 
by mail. Correspondence is solicited. Such letters may be addressed 
to the President, 

T. G. BROWNSON, 

McMinnville, Oregon. 



McMINNVILLE COLLEGE. 



27 



NAMES OF STUDENTS 



NAMES. 

Martin E. Adams 
Florence Alexander 
John H. Alexander 
Pearl Alexander 
Viola Alexander 
Alsea Baker 
Edith B. Brown 
Frank W. Bewley 
Bernal B. Bewley 
Etta Cook 
Lynn Cook 
Wilber Cook 
Anna Conner 
George Conner 
Gideon Davis 



RESIDENCE. 

McMinnville 
Independence 



McMinnville 
North Yamhill 

Colville, Wash. 

< < 

McMinnville 



DEPARTMENT. 

Academic 



Ballston 



Tillamook 



s? 



Florence Alexander 
Pearl Alexander 
Bessie Cook 
George Conner 
Bradford Dodson 
J. B. Dodson 
Eddie Graham 
J. R. G. Haynes. 
Lizzie Handley 
CEara Jeter 
Nellie Latourette- 
Lyman Latourette 
Nellie Mc Mi lien 
Colnian Mark 
Arthur McPhillips. 
Arthur Pope 
Lena Pagenkopf 
Fred Ramsey 
Willie Scott 
Marian Sully 
Mattie Walton 



McMINNVILLE COLLEG E . 



VOCAL. 



or 



*U; 



>*, 



John Alexander 
Edith Brown 
Lynn Cook 
Nettie Dickinson. 
W. J. Dodson 
Letta Fellows 
Antchell Haynes 
Mbert Huguelet 
Alberta Ingraham 
Lula Jones 
Nina Latourette: 
John Loder 
Jewell Mark 
May Million 
Scott McCutcheom 
Ida Pagenkopf 
Anna Pagenkopf 
Singne Swanson 
Winfield Scott 
Ralph Storey 
George Williams 



3 0112 105813999 



.